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This case study shows that the actual CO2 reductions of 18.6% achieved in the 2018 Camry exceed the 17.7% reductions predicted by EPA models. This confirms that the OMEGA and LPM models accurately predict both new technology benefits and synergies between technologies. It also suggests that other studies contradicting EPA model outcomes are inaccurate and underpredict future technology benefits.

Summarizes the potential in Europe of presently available efficiency technologies to produce fuel savings that greatly exceed the upfront costs of technology and maintenance, and evaluates emerging advanced efficiency technologies that offer even more substantial fuel savings and short payback periods over the long term.

Summarizes and evaluates key elements of the November 2017 European Commission proposal as it goes to the European Parliament and the European Council.

2018.02.21

This case study shows that the actual CO2 reductions of 18.6% achieved in the 2018 Camry exceed the 17.7% reductions predicted by EPA models. This confirms that the OMEGA and LPM models accurately predict both new technology benefits and synergies between technologies. It also suggests that other studies contradicting EPA model outcomes are inaccurate and underpredict future technology benefits.

Publication: Working paper
2018.01.16

Summarizes the potential in Europe of presently available efficiency technologies to produce fuel savings that greatly exceed the upfront costs of technology and maintenance, and evaluates emerging advanced efficiency technologies that offer even more substantial fuel savings and short payback periods over the long term.

Publication: White paper
2018.01.09

Summarizes and evaluates key elements of the November 2017 European Commission proposal as it goes to the European Parliament and the European Council.

Publication: Briefing
2017.12.07

Synopsis of new fuel-efficiency standards for diesel-powered trucks and buses with a gross vehicle weight of 12 tonnes or more that will go into effect beginning 1 April 2018.

Publication: Policy update
2017.11.28

A statistical portrait of passenger car, light commercial, and heavy-duty vehicle fleets in the European Union from 2001 to 2016, with emphasis on vehicle technologies, fuel consumption, and emissions of greenhouse gases and other air pollutants.

Publication: Report
2017.11.05

This update adds one new data source, for a total of 14, covering 16 years, eight countries, and approximately 1.1 million cars. The analysis shows that, in the EU, the gap between official and real-world CO2 emission values continues to grow—from 9% in 2001 to 42% in 2016.

Publication: White paper
2017.11.05

Investigates the gap between real-world and official CO2 emission values in the four largest vehicle markets in the world: China, the EU, Japan, and the United States. The analysis shows that the gap has increased in all markets since 2001. 

Publication: White paper

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