Topics / Black carbon

Black carbon refers to solid particles emitted during incomplete combustion. Diesel engines are an important source, though not the major one. Black carbon contributes to climate change in two ways: in the atmosphere it absorbs sunlight and re-emits the energy as heat; and when deposited on ice or snow, in addition to warming the surface and air directly, it reduces the surface albedo (reflectivity) causing the surface to absorb more sunlight. As a contributor to climate change it is possibly second only to CO2, and because it is short-lived (remaining in the atmosphere only a few weeks) reducing BC emissions could have a very rapid and significant effect on the rate of warming. Black carbon is also a serious public health concern. Exposure to particulate matter is responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths globally each year.

Most Recent

Examines the cost of alternate marine fuels and presents a pathway for replacing heavy fuel oil in the Arctic.

An updated global inventory of black carbon emissions from the global shipping sector with several recommendations on how to reduce black carbon emissions from ships.

Provides information on market dynamics, opportunities and barriers for truck fuel-saving technologies and operational measures, and the potential benefits of building a more robust and extensive Transporte Limpio program, and harmonizing it with the SmartWay program in the U.S.

2015.04.17
This past January, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) made long-anticipated progress on the definition of black carbon from shipping.
Blog Post
2015.03.31
On Friday, March 27, Mexico issued its commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as part of the U.N.
Blog Post
2015.03.24

Investigates the contribution of black carbon from shipping to the global diesel black carbon inventory — 8% to 13% in 2010, a proportion that is not expected to decline under current and planned IMO policies.

Publication: Working paper
2015.03.02

Evaluates eight vehicle replacement programs from around the world and identifies five best practices in the areas of program design and implementation, as well as fiscal incentives and policies, to serve as guidelines for policymakers.

Publication: White paper
2015.01.30

Presents an emissions inventory based on scenarios for growth in marine vessel traffic in the U.S. Arctic in 2025. At current fuel sulfur levels, pollutant emissions from ships in the region could increase 150%–600%.

Publication: Working paper
2014.11.06
The first principle governing the ICCT’s work, established in the 2001 Bellagio Memorandum, was to “design programs and policies that reduce conventional . . .
Blog Post
2014.10.09

First of three workshops designed to inform and guide a new two-year CCAC funded project on marine black carbon.

Event

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