Staff blog

Sales of battery electric buses are surging, yet a complete technology transition won't happen overnight. Meanwhile, tightening emission standards on conventionally powered buses would have immediate benefits for air quality in many of the world's fastest growing megacities.
Indonesian drivers probably don’t realize they are paying more at the pump because of their country’s biodiesel mandate, which sets ambitious targets for the blending of biodiesel in diesel fuel. Indonesia’s biodiesel mandate is scheduled to increase to 30% in 2020, and as total transport fuel consumption is expected to grow steadily, this means the total amount of biodiesel required, and the total additional fuel costs to consumers, will ramp up quickly.
A first reaction to the European Commission's proposal, released yesterday, for extending the new-car and light-commercial vehicle CO2 emissions standards out to 2030.
The food-based biofuel cap is in the Commission’s Renewable Energy Directive (RED II) proposal for a reason, and effectively removing it through the exception for HSCCBs can hardly be called “sustainable.”
Governments the world over face major challenges to reduce the health and environmental impacts from the transportation sector. Steering the car market to electric vehicles and ultimately zero-emission fleets will require comprehensive and sustained policy action.
São Paulo’s clean bus transition has been delayed for long enough. The negotiations of the Article 50 amendment provide an opportunity for policymakers to put the city back on the right path for fulfilling climate, health, and technology innovation goals. Strong actions would place the city ahead of the curve as more and more cities around the world consider similar transitions to clean bus fleets.