Staff blog: Compliance and Enforcement

As both U.S. and Canada work to improve their C&E programs, we applaud their team effort to tackle air quality challenges, encourage them to continue to strengthen this partnership, and hope to see more such regional collaborations around the globe whenever the circumstances allow. Because when it comes to emission control in the highly integrated North American vehicle market, two feds are better than one.
Even though Japan’s compliance and enforcement program is one of the most comprehensive, it could still be improved. Japan has an outsize influence on compliance and enforcement worldwide because it is home to major automotive manufacturers that sell their products worldwide. We should all hope that Japan's regulatory agencies keep playing tough, then, because that may translate into an outsize benefit to people’s health and the climate.
In September three MEPs convened a fruitful discussion on using remote sensing technology to measure pollutant emissions in vehicle exhaust in Europe’s cities.
The city is taking a big step forward in fighting air pollution, and other cities would benefit from doing the same.
On June 26, the BMVI finally published the CO2 measurement results we had been waiting for. But in the interim the Ministry re-tested 29 of the original vehicle models. Only a subset of those results, data on 19 out of the 29, was published and in many cases, the vehicles show lower CO2 emissions during the retest than according to their official type-approval value. Those are impressively good results—and strikingly different than the initial results from 2016.
Policy adjustments, created largely in response to the high-profile subsidy fraud scandal, mark major reforms for China’s EV market. As an old Chinese saying goes, “A loss may turn out to be a gain.” After being struck by this scandal, China’s EV market may find the right path toward a prosperous future.