Staff blog

Feebate systems can be an effective policy tool for promoting vehicle efficiency. A change that France made recently to its feebate system illustrates the absolute best way to do things, while a look back at what changed illustrates why alternatives are . . . not best.
Newer is not always better. California’s ILUC analysis relies on stronger evidence on palm oil expansion than a new study from Argonne National Laboratory.
If the experience in Mexico is any indication, some manufacturers will likely look to weaken and delay the inevitable, rather than embracing and enacting cleaner standards that will make cities more livable, reduce climate pollution, generate tremendous social benefits, and most or all save many thousands of lives throughout the region.
Two recent ICCT studies on the fuel efficiency of airlines revealed different gaps between the most and least efficient airlines operating transatlantic and transpacific routes. Could this be due to passenger load and frieght carrage?
One might assume that the larger the plane, the more fuel-efficient it is per passenger due to economies of scale. But in the case of flights over the Pacific, conventional wisdom turns out to be wrong. Size matters, but not in the way you think.
Would ICCT's recent transpacific fuel efficiency ranking change if dedicated freighters were taken into account? Did the rankings incorrectly reward airlines for carrying belly freight when putting that cargo on a dedicated freighter would have saved more fuel overall? The numbers show that, since increasing payload to aircraft's structural maximum increases the fuel efficiency of each flight, belly freight is indeed one weird trick for improving airline efficiency.