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With nearly 250 million light duty vehicles on the road, the United States has the largest vehicle fleet in the world, and annual new vehicle sales second only to China.

Despite its historical role in pioneering vehicle regulations, from the mid-1980s until very recently the U.S. lagged behind other developed nations in passenger vehicle fuel economy standards and emissions regulations (see the global PV standards update), with higher levels of CO2 emissions per mile, higher average fuel consumption, and lower average fuel economy. However, since 2009 the United States has adopted aggressive legislation that could make the country a global leader in fuel efficiency and GHG emissions control. And market demand for fuel-efficient gasoline, hybrid, and electric vehicles is growing.

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Recently Released

Downsized, boosted gasoline engines
This technical brief highlights important innovations and trends in downsized and turbocharged gasoline engines, several of which were not considered when the 2025 CAFE standards were finalized, but promise to be quite cost-...
Briefing
Lightweighting technology development and trends in U.S. passenger vehicles
Advances in lightweighting (mass-reduction) designs and technology have surpassed projections made for the U.S. 2025 vehicle CAFE/GHG standard. Overall, weight reduction of ~15% should be feasible by 2025, at costs about one-...
Working paper
Evolution of incentives to sustain the transition to a global electric vehicle fleet
Analyzes near-term electric vehicle trends to inform on how governments might optimally evolve their electric vehicle incentive programs to sustain market growth. Assess how electric vehicle costs are reduced in the 2020—2025...
White paper
 

News

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From the ICCT Blogs

Beyond hazardous
In Beijing, air pollution is once again off the charts. The air-quality challenge is exacerbated by geographical and meteorological conditions, but the human-made pollution is anything but a natural disaster, and the transportation sector, like all sectors, must do everything possible to reduce emissions.
Staff Blog
Diesels dip, electric vehicles rise in Germany
The theme that ties together the good and the bad headlines emanating from Germany is that the car market is changing, from diesel engines—the German car industry’s bread and butter—to electric motors.
Staff Blog
The next generation of electric vehicles is on the way
Electric vehicle metrics like range and cost are expected to continue to dramatically improve over the next few years as the next-generation technology emerges. In turn, these cost reductions will enable competitive pricing for high-volume mainstream markets.
Staff Blog

The Staff

John German
John German
Senior Fellow / US Co-Lead
Nic Lutsey
Nic Lutsey
Program Director / US Co-Lead
Peter Slowik
Peter Slowik
Associate Researcher