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The reductions in passenger vehicle emissions that have been achieved since the mid-twentieth century are a great environmental success story. Government regulation of tailpipe emissions and private investments in breakthrough technologies such as the three-way catalytic converter have reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons by 75 to 90 percent at a relatively small cost to consumers. Since California first established emission standards for passenger vehicles in the 1960s, different regulatory approaches have been adopted by the United States, Japan, and Europe, and each has been emulated to some degree in other parts of the world. Significant work remains to replicate these successes throughout the rest of the global fleet.

The massive impact of passenger vehicles on climate also remains to be addressed. The transportation sector is responsible for about one-quarter of energy-related greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Passenger vehicles account for just under half of this total, and will remain the predominant source of these emissions for the foreseeable future.

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Recently Released

Assessment of leading electric vehicle promotion activities in United States cities
Surveys actions being taken by state and local governments and public utilities to facilitate electric vehicle deployment in the 25 largest U.S. metro areas. Presents city-specific analysis of consumer benefits and links between...
White paper
Hybrid vehicles: Trends in technology development and cost reduction
Technical summary for policy makers of the status of hybrid vehicle development in the United States. First in a series of technical briefing papers on trends in energy efficiency of passenger vehicles in the U.S.
Briefing
CO2 emissions from new passenger cars in the EU: Car manufacturers’ performance in 2014
Summary based on the provisional data recently released by the European Environment Agency. All manufacturers have achieved their 2015 targets, with average emissions of 123.3 g/km in 2014, a decrease of 3% compared to 2013.
Briefing
 

News

News

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2015 Volvo XC60: Crossover heralds driving efficiency
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From the ICCT Blogs

Electric vehicles rising, in select US cities
As our latest study demonstrates, digging down to the city and regional level can illuminate what's really happening across markets and identify how policies and promotional activities are connected to electric vehicle sales.
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Hybrids break into the Japanese market (July 2015 update)
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Staff Blog
What the NRC report on LDV technologies does and doesn't add to the debate in the run up to the US CAFE 2025 standard midterm evaluation
Convincing support for the agencies' initial analysis, that could have pushed its conclusions even further.
Staff Blog

The Staff

Anup Bandivadekar
Anup Bandivadekar
Program Director / India Lead
John German
John German
Senior Fellow / US Co-Lead
Hui He
Hui He
Senior Policy Analyst / China Co-Lead
Fanta Kamakaté
Fanta Kamakaté
Chief Program Officer
Peter Mock
Peter Mock
Europe Managing Director / EU Lead