programs / Marine

Translate

Ships are a very efficient means of moving goods, across the globe or along a nation's coastline or inland waterways. But they are also an increasingly important source of air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. The conventional pollutants produced by shipping are primarily sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides and particulates. Some portion of this pollution occurs far from land, but an estimated 70 to 80 percent of air toxics from oceangoing vessels are released within 400 kilometers of shore, where they can have substantial effects on human health. Carbon dioxide emissions from international shipping more than doubled between 1990 and 2007. The marine sector now generates about 2.7 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions, and recent growth projections suggest it could account for seven percent of global emissions by 2050.

How nations decide to regulate marine emissions over the next decade, individually and collectively, will hold important implications for air quality and the global climate.

Featured Work

Events

SEE ALL EVENTS

Recently Released

Distribution of air pollution from oceangoing vessels in the Greater Pearl River Delta, 2015
Compiles a high-resolution ship emissions inventory in the Greater Pearl River Delta (GPRD), a heavily populated and prosperous region with heavy ship traffic. Because this traffic contributes to poor local air quality, the...
Working paper
Prevalence of heavy fuel oil and black carbon in Arctic shipping, 2015 to 2025
Estimates heavy fuel oil (HFO) use, HFO carriage, the use and carriage of other fuels, BC emissions, and emissions of other air and climate pollutants in the Arctic for the year 2015, with projections to 2020 and 2025.
Report
Alternatives to heavy fuel oil use in the Arctic: Economic and environmental tradeoffs
Compares the economic and environmental tradeoffs of switching from HFO to two alternative fuels, distillate fuel and liquefied natural gas (LNG), in the IMO Arctic, as defined in the IMO Polar Code.
Working paper
 

From the ICCT Blogs

The IMO just took a significant step toward reducing the use of heavy fuel oil in the Arctic
The IMO will consider concrete proposals on ways to reduce the risks of HFO at the next meeting of its Marine Environment Protection Committee, MEPC 72 in April 2018. A decision on what should be done to mitigate the risks of HFO could come as early as 2019.
Staff Blog
Quibbles over the perfect way to measure black carbon emissions from ships are keeping us from commonsense moves to control them
Without regulation, it’s unlikely that the international maritime shipping sector will voluntarily find ways to cut black carbon emissions, despite the climate benefit. Thus, we need to move on from quibbling about the “perfect” measurement method and start debating the opportunities to cut black carbon control emissions. But we must move quickly. Because the Arctic we’re aiming to protect can’t keep its cool much longer.
Staff Blog
End of Crystal Serenity’s voyage spotlights way to ban toxic fuel in Arctic
With Arctic shipping expected to rise, there may be an argument that communities in the Arctic ought to be protected from ship emissions just like the rest of the continent. Though it’s an open issue whether the Arctic will win protection from pollution by ships.
Staff Blog

The Staff

Fanta Kamakaté
Fanta Kamakaté
Chief Program Officer
Naya Olmer
Naya Olmer
Marine Program Associate
Daniel Rutherford
Daniel Rutherford
Program Director / Japan Lead