programs / Fuels

Translate

Using gasoline and diesel as transport fuel causes emissions of both greenhouse gases, driving climate change, and of other air pollutants that are dangerous to human health and the natural environment. Transportation is the fastest-growing source of human-produced greenhouse gases. To prevent destructive climate change and reduce health impacts, the sector needs to move towards fuels that have a lower carbon footprint, and reduced emissions of sulfur and other conventional pollutants.

Featured Work

Events

SEE ALL EVENTS

Recently Released

Sustainability criteria for biofuels made from land and non-land based feedstocks
Prepares a proposal for a set of sustainability criteria that could be integrated into post-2020 EU legislation as a way to guarantee the sustainability of the next phase of the development of alternative fuels in Europe.
Consultant report
Oil market futures: Effects of low-carbon transport policies on long-term oil prices
Oil prices will be lower in the future if low-carbon transport technologies are mass deployed, as these technologies will drive a significant reduction in global demand for oil.
Consulting report
Crops of the biofrontier: In search of opportunities for sustainable energy cropping
Describes case studies of energy cropping in Europe in the context of advanced biofuel and bioproducts sustainability.
White paper
 

From the ICCT Blogs

2015 Global electric vehicle trends: Which markets are up (the most)
The state of the EV market in 2015: Countries with relatively high EV sales, as a percentage of new vehicle sales, remained high while others with lower EV sales were still catching up.
Staff Blog
The emissions test defeat device problem in Europe is not about VW
The methods used by other manufacturers to tell when a vehicle is not on a test cycle may differ from VW's, but they are still improperly reducing the effectiveness of emission controls in the real world.
Staff Blog
What the Senate missed in counting forest bioenergy emissions
Using whole trees for biomass is not going to be an effective climate mitigation strategy. It’s clear that proper carbon accounting is needed for all biomass pathways, and EPA should be allowed to follow the best available science in determining the greenhouse gas impact of any bioenergy feedstock.
Staff Blog

The Staff

Fanta Kamakaté
Fanta Kamakaté
Chief Program Officer
Nic Lutsey
Nic Lutsey
Program Director / US Co-Lead