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China’s transportation-sector CO2 emissions more than doubled from 2000 to 2010 and are projected to increase by another 54 percent by 2020 from 2010 levels. For China to meet its 2020 target to reduce economy-wide carbon intensity by 17 percent in 2015 from 2010 levels, the growth in emissions must be approximately cut in half.

Led by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) and the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT), the nation is taking steps to make that happen. Phase III of China’s light duty vehicle fuel consumption regulations includes its first-ever standards for fleet average fuel consumption, which will reduce fuel consumption to 7 L/100km by 2015, a 13 percent improvement of new fleet vehicles between 2008 and 2015. Phase IV standards are under development. For heavy duty vehicles, China is in the process of developing Phase 1 standards, expected for 2015–2020.

China also faces challenges related to conventional pollutants and air quality. Annual average concentrations of coarse particulate matter (PM10) nationwide are at 98 µg/m3, which exceeds the World Health Organization ambient air quality standard by a factor of five. All 29 Chinese cities for which ground-based measurements are reported experience levels of air pollution at least double the recommended WHO standard.

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Marine engine emission standards for China's domestic vessels
On August 30, 2016, China’s Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) and the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ) jointly released the first-ever national emission standards for...
Policy update
China's Stage 6 emission standard for new light-duty vehicles (final rule)
The China 6 standard combines best practices from both European and U.S. regulatory requirements in addition to creating its own. This policy update provides detail on how this standard is unique, a comparison with emission...
Policy update
Proposed fuel-consumption standards for two- and three-wheelers in China
The Chinese Ministry of Industry, Information and Technology released, for public comments, proposed fuel-consumption standards for two- and three-wheeled vehicles (motorcycles and mopeds). Upon approval, the new standards will...
Policy update
 

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The Staff

Anup Bandivadekar
Anup Bandivadekar
Program Director / India Lead
Jessica Chu
Jessica Chu
Office Manager & Assistant to the CPO
Hui He
Hui He
Senior Policy Analyst / China Lead
Ray Minjares
Ray Minjares
Clean Air Lead